Navy Technology Transfer Navy Technology Transfer

Other Technologies of Interest

Adjustable Cable Hanger for Securing Cables Externally

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division has developed a technology that secures external cables to mobilization shipping and stowage containers, allowing the cables to be suspended from the deck/ground and over walkways around the shipping and stowage container. It is designed to be mounted to either side or on top of the fittings using a double-ended twist lock.


Adjustable Ergonomic Firearm Grip

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division

Currently, assault rifle grips are fixed at a specific angle, primarily based on the ability to fire a rifle with the center of mass aligned to the forearm, with little to no wrist movement. The grip angle best accommodates shooting from the hip and a traditional bladed rifle stance. Tactical shooting has led to the development of a squared, or athletic, stance. With the squared stance, the shooter’s shoulders are squared-up with the target, the buttstock of the rifle is near the centerline of the body and high up on the chest, and elbows are kept down and tucked in. With current rifle grips, this stance results in ulnar deviation of the wrist causing wrist fatigue and injury. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, has designed, developed, and patented an adjustable ergonomic rifle grip that allows the grip angle to be modified to accommodate different shooting stances. By rotating the grip, wrist fatigue and injury can be minimized by allowing the shooter to hold the weapon at, or closer to, the natural wrist position. Additionally, the rotatable grip can be folded up to the body of the firearm to make it more compact for concealment or storage.


Apparatus and Methods for Forming Hollow Spheres

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division seeks partners to license and commercialize this device and process to manufacture high-strength and stiffness cellular materials. The patented foams made from amorphous hollow spheres combine to make cellular structures of high strength and stiffness. These structures are built from millions of microscopic glass (or metallic-glass) bubbles—about the diameter of a human hair—into new super-strong, super-light, shock absorbing, and buoyant constructs. Test results show that the cellular material made from these spheres dissipated more mechanical energy for a given volume than any other cellular material on the planet (14.8 megajoules per cubic meter). Navy researchers have continued their work on this material with a focus on devices for scalable production and their related processes. This technology accommodates high-melting point materials including ceramics and composites, and a modular nozzle assembly wherein the relative position of the gas and liquid material outlets may be controllably adjusted in any dimension.


High Energy Storage Capacitor

Naval Research Laboratory

The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a method of electroless deposition of conformal
ultrathin (<20 nm) metal oxides on the high-surface-area walls of commercial carbon
nanofoam papers, typically 0.1–0.3 mm thick. The resulting ultrathin metal oxides
rapidly take up and release electrons and ions, thereby storing energy at 300–600 Farads per
gram of oxide, while the carbon nanofoam paper serves as a three-dimensional current
collector and defines a pre-selected porous electrode architecture. The high surface-tovolume
ratio of oxide-painted carbon nanofoam enables footprint-normalized capacitances
of 1–10 F·cm-2 addressable within tens of seconds, a time scale of relevance for hybrid
electric vehicles. Pairing MnOx–carbon nanofoam with FeOx–carbon nanofoam yields an
energy-storage device with an extended operating voltage in mild aqueous electrolytes (~2
V) that provides technologically relevant energy and power density while also being low
cost, safe to operate, and environmentally benign. Applications for this technology include
hybrid-electric systems, bridge and/or backup power, and energy recovery.


High Value Silicon Carbide from Agricultural Waste

Naval Research Laboratory

Research scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory have shown that using high temperatures
or microwaves many agricultural wastes can be transformed into high value silicon
carbide (SiC) consisting of nanostructures and nanorods in various polytypes. Billions of
pounds of agricultural waste are generated every year worldwide. Rice and wheat husks,
corn stalks, cobs, sorghum leaves, peanut shells and other residues are considered to have
no value and are plowed into fields or incinerated. Normal incineration temperatures create
environmental problems by releasing ash, carbon dioxide, and nanoparticles into the
air. However, these agricultural wastes have significantly high silica content in a molecular
state in close proximity to hydrocarbons. Silicon carbide is used for electronic and structural
devices due to its high breakdown voltage, chemical inertness, high thermal conductivity,
dimensional stability, wide band gap, high radiation resistance, thermal shock resistance,
and mechanical hardness. Scientists are engaged in transforming these silicon carbide
nanomaterials into transparent windows and domes for applications as armor, hypersonic
missiles, and thermal control of thin disc lases. Potential uses of SiC for chemical
sensing, optical metamaterials, structural composites and nanoscale electronic devices are
also being investigated at NRL as well as applications which promise enhancements in infrared
spectroscopy.


Instant, Accurate, Fumeless Fingerprint Detection

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake

Acting in quick response to an urgent need by the U.S. Special Operations Forces, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake researchers developed a smart powder that revolutionizes all of this and requires no chambers. Detection can be done easily in the open air in seconds. The new smart powders specifically/chemically bind to fingerprint residues. A solid-state reaction (as opposed to fuming gas or applying liquid) significantly reduces operator error and enhances ease of use. For one application, the Department of Defense needed to get quick prints off of improvised explosive devices in the field. Likewise, for technology transfer applications, this technology allows forensic units to quickly take quick prints from large and fixed items in the field, such as automotive doors and trunks, office windows and elevators. In many cases, these items would need to be removed and physically taken to a lab in order to obtain highly accurate results. This new technology benefits all types of forensic agencies including local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and military forensic units.


Life Preserver Location System

Naval Postgraduate School

This technology from the Naval Postgraduate School is a life preserver locator system that assists in locating and rescuing a person fallen overboard. The system is self-contained and can be added to an existing life preserver ring. A signal assembly automatically activates on exposure to saltwater and deploys an inflated balloon with lighting into the air to assist the person overboard in finding the life preserver. When the person reaches the life preserver, they can change the lighting pattern or color through a simple switch mechanism to signal a rescue ship that they have reached the life preserver. The deployed balloon aids in establishing visual contact and improves the ability of the rescue ship to locate the person and then maneuver to their position.


Method and Apparatus for Automated Secure One-Way Data Transmission System

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division

The present disclosure relates to a method and system for one-way data transmission from an open network to a closed network. A data transmission controller on an open network provides a data stream to first, second, and third transmitter nodes on the open network. The first and second transmitter nodes transmit the data stream to corresponding receiver nodes on a closed network. The third transmitter node transmits the data stream to a receiver node on the open network. Data transmission verification is performed at both the open network and the closed network.


Method and Apparatus for Three-Type or Form Authentication with Ergonomic Positioning

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division

This technology is a system and method for authenticating a user for access to a system input terminal that includes an infrared imager, a user input terminal, and a processing section, including a plurality of processing instructions operable to perform image capture for wrist areas of a user in proximity to an input terminal or other structures requiring authentication and comparison to determine access or deny access. An aspect of an embodiment of the invention permits initial and frequent authentication that reduces or eliminates user action to perform such authentication. Also provided are user interfaces and additional authentication sections operable with the infrared imager. Alternative embodiments of the invention include a mobile embodiment as well as an embodiment including a sensor positioned with respect to a user in an operational position where the user is performing a task in relation to an input terminal or structure requiring authentication (e.g. a keyboard).


Multi-Segmented Magnetic Robot

Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific (formerly Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific)

The patented multi-segmented magnetic robot (MSMR) addresses capability gaps by providing climbing and maneuverability over typical ferrous surfaces that often include discontinuities in the form of protrusions and indentations, especially in ship hull applications where hull-plating sections meet. The key to its effective maneuverability lies in the multi-segmented design approach, while its low acoustic signature is achieved via its wheel design. The MSMR is composed of 1) segment modules, which contain the system electronics, motors, and batteries, 2) articulated linkages, which allow relative motion between modules, and 3) magnetic wheels that provide surface adhesion and traction. Position feedback from linkages and wheels are provided to the system software that allows for smooth motion while traversing obstacles and corners. The MSMR’s modular construct allows for additional segments to be added to accommodate a variety of sensors. The MSMR is available for licensing and further development.


New Device Detects Explosives, Drugs, or Lead

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake

In 2009, the Department of Defense (DoD) required a multi-test field kit that was small, lightweight, rugged, and had a one-year shelf life with the ability to operate in a variety of field environments (hot/cold/high/low humidity). Researchers at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake answered the call and invented a field colorimetric test device that does not require gloves and is easy to use, accurate and foolproof, refillable, disposable, and can detect anything that gives a colorimetric response to solid or liquid reagents. Professionals estimate that the remarkable invention has shown a 50% improvement over prior technology. The system is also adaptable, like a first-aid kit, and comes in a convenient all-in-one small packet. In addition, it has a sample now and analyze later capability. The invention has direct benefits to DoD warfighters in the field, law enforcement agencies, emergency response teams, and workforce safety applications.


Outboard Motor Compression Transom Attachment Assembly

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division has developed and patented an out-board compression transom attachment assembly that can quickly and securely mount an outboard motor onto a standard boat transom or an inflatable craft. The attachment assembly replaces the standard threaded screws used by the outboard industry to attach small and medium size outboard motors to boat transoms.


Precision Ground Measurements from an Unmanned Aerial System Platform

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division

Navy researchers have developed an aerial platform based measurement system configured to operate in a variety of locations to measure distances, determine ground points, analyze the speed of moving objects, and perform other velocity measurements and analyses. The unmanned aerial system platform is configured to establish a measurement or coordinate area in which to detect objects, the distance between objects relative to each other, and the velocity of objects moving within the area. The system includes an inertial measurement unit to determine attitude, a global navigation satellite system, a scaling unit and a gimbal control unit. The system could be used for speed monitoring in both law enforcement and recreational or professional sports settings. The system is easily deployed to monitor traffic and can monitor vehicular velocities over a diversity of terrain such as flat or irregular ground. The system’s precision is based on laser rangefinder or LIDAR, an altimeter, or any other device configured for distance measurement between a ground point and camera.


RAPIER® Full Motion Video

Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific (formerly Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific)

Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific has developed the RAPIER Full Motion Video (RAPIER FMV), a maritime target detection, tracking, and identification solution that quickly and automatically analyzes video, alerts analysts of important targets, and outputs target information. At the core of RAPIER FMV is an object detection system that uses basic signal processing and machine learning approaches. The system maintains a high level of performance without making prior assumptions about foreground-background characteristics. It is robust to variations in illumination, ever-changing background characteristics, video quality, as well as abrupt changes in the perspective, size, appearance, and number of targets. RAPIER FMV also uses a unique detection method that aids in improving processing times.


Rope Climbing Machine for Exercise and Strength

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division

Traditional rope climbing requires 20 feet or more of height to provide any real exercise or training when climbing. Often it is not practical to install a rope in a gym or training facility due to ceiling heights and safety hazards without harnesses and safety lines. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division has developed and patented a rope climbing machine with a continuous rope and a variable braking system that can be used for fully suspended rope climbing technique practice and exercise. The machine can be used in a room with standard ceiling heights and the variable braking system allows the speed to be customized for individual users.


Screw Removal and Insertion Tool

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake (NAWCWD) engineers developed a tool that successfully and easily removes screws without damage to the screws or the tool. It provides a dramatic 200% improvement. Flat crosshead (Phillips) screws connecting HARM Missile body segments were difficult to remove and insert without damaging screws and/or the tool. It was also difficult to tighten screws to the proper torque value without the tool slipping and damaging the screw head and/or drive tool. To solve this problem, NAWCWD engineers developed a tool that successfully and easily removes screws without damage to the screws or the tool. It provides a dramatic improvement and also provides the ability to insert the screws to a proper torque value without damage to either the screws or the tool. The tool is useful for maintenance and fabrication of aircraft and missile components. In addition to military applications, the tool could be useful in removing and inserting screws in pipes, housings, and other circular shapes and would be useful in oil field operations, commercial and military ship building, construction (pipefitters), and for other general home do it yourself projects.


Siloxane-Based Nonskid and Topside Coatings

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division

The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a novel siloxane-based nonskid and topside
coatings for Navy surface ships. The siloxane nonskid is a two-component (2K) system
with a 4:1 mix ratio (by volume) that is applied via roll or spray to generate a rough profile.
The topside coating is a single-component (1K) system that does not require the mixing of
components and is applied via spray, brush, or roll. Both coatings are being qualified to
MIL-Specification requirements. Advantages of this technology include enhanced performance,
longer service life, reduced corrosion compared to currently qualified nonskid and
topside coatings, and reduction in maintenance costs for the Navy. Application areas for
this technology include maritime ship and structures, oil rigs, process plants, pleasure watercraft, helicopter landing zones, public walkways, ramps and stairwells, and railcars.


Space Robotics: Satellite Servicing Technologies

Naval Research Laboratory

The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed safe autonomous robotics controls and focused development on understanding the interactions between all of the unique elements that must work together to make satellite servicing a reality. Robotic servicing promises to bring in a new era of increasingly resilient on-orbit operations by providing the ability to finely inspect, reposition, repair, and upgrade existing spacecraft. NRL spent nearly two decades working to transition unmanned robotic satellite servicing from a research and development concept to a fielded national capability.


Three-Dimensional Zinc Electrode Architectures for HighPerformance Batteries

Naval Research Laboratory

Zinc-based batteries offer a safe, inexpensive alternative to fire-prone lithium-based batteries, yet have been historically limited by poor rechargeability. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has eradicated this centuries-old roadblock by developing a three-dimensional (3D) zinc (Zn) “sponge” electrode architecture comprising interpenetrating networks of Zn scaffolding and void space. The design characteristics of NRL’s 3D Zn sponge yield superior electrochemical properties when cycled in alkaline electrolytes compared to conventional Zn powder-composite electrodes. The longstanding problem of dendrite formation upon cycling is solved by distributing current more homogeneously in 3D throughout the electrode volume, while the void structure constrains dissolution/precipitation processes within the electrode. This breakthrough transforms the future capabilities and performance of the entire family of Zn-based alkaline batteries. By swapping in NRL’s 3D Zn sponge for traditional powdered or foil Zn anodes, NRL has demonstrated fully rechargeable nickel-zinc prototype cells that challenge lithium-ion performance, but which use aqueous-based cell chemistry that is inherently safer than the nonaqueous liquids used in lithium batteries. Applications for this technology include primary (disposable) batteries, secondary (rechargeable) batteries, and 3D solid-state batteries.


Tool for Fastening an Attachment Element to a Surface

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division has developed a tool which defines a piston/cylinder with first and second chambers on either side of the piston. A sealable port couples the first chamber to the ambient environment. A melting device in thermal communication with the meltable material simultaneously heats an air/water mixture in the second chamber and melts the meltable material. An element releasably coupled to the tool spans a region within the cartridge that lies within the channel. The element incorporates a check valve separating the volume defined by the tool and ambient environment.